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Milton At A Glance

By Elizabeth R. Elstien

Part of the Greater Boston area, Milton, Massachusetts is a suburban community steeped in history. Long a farming community, the town is now a suburb outside of Boston. Money magazine placed Milton in the top 10 on their "Best Places to Live" list for three years (2007, 2009, 2011).

History

Home to the Neponset American Indian Tribe and settled in 1640 by Puritans as part of Dorchester and incorporated as an independent town in 1662, Milton sits south of Boston along the Neponset River. A 1674 powder mill is believed to be the earliest in the U.S. colonies. Soon the industrial potential of the town was developed with mills of all types and the first chocolate factory in New England (Walter Baker Chocolate Factory established in 1764). Primarily a farming community until the U.S. Civil War, the population increased due to railroad and streetcar transportation expansion, allowing a faster commute to Boston for employment. Estates were broken up into subdivisions by 1929 due to population growth. Both former president George H.W. Bush and architect Buckminster Fuller were born in Milton. Today's population of this Boston suburb is 27,000.

Neighborhoods and People

Milton is a walled suburban town with neighborhoods of single-family homes. A windy town, it has gracious tree-lined streets, historic homes and a stable environment. Many 1800 houses and estates, early 1900 workers' housing and field-stone walls are common. A high number of Milton residents cite Irish heritage (38 percent), higher than any other town in the U.S.

Education

Milton has an outstanding school system with six public schools. All have been renovated in recent years. For about 30 years, the town has been known for its French immersion program where children start learning the French language in First grade and continue through their high school years. There are several private schools, including prep school Milton Academy, Fontbonne Academy (girls' school) and Curry College.

Economy

No longer a rural farming community, jobs in Milton are largely professional, sales/office, management/business or service with a median yearly income of $65,000. Milton has a higher percentage of residents making over $100,000 a year than the national average. Unemployment in considerably lower than the national average.

Transportation

The town has easy access to Route 128 and Interstates 93 and 95. The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) Redline subway goes into Boston via the Milton station stop on the Ashmont?Mattapan High Speed Line, allowing residents easy public transportation access to dining, entertainment and employment options.

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About The Author

Elizabeth R. Elstien has worked in real estate for over 15 years as a real estate...

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